Tailoring The Coat Sleeve!

7:30 AM

I'm currently in the midst of working on my vintage coat - Vogue Couturier Design 2925 from Fabiani.  I'd originally planned to make current pattern offering, Vogue 8346.  That's a good coat pattern, but I wanted great.  And then I came across this beauty.  After last year's amazing vintage coat, there's no way I could go back to current pattern offerings right now.  I love the drafting and instructions in vintage patterns.  It's like taking a tailoring course.  Plus, the interfacing pattern pieces are already there.  No need to have to draft and figure out where to interface.  You won't find that in modern patterns.  

I just set my sleeves, so let's talk a little about that.  By the way, here is an update on my blog so that you can take a look at the inside and see how it's interfaced with hair canvas.
This coat has a two-piece sleeve.  For my coats and jackets, I prefer a two-piece sleeve instead of a one-piece sleeve.  Why?  Because a one-piece sleeve is "symmetrical".  Our arms are NOT.  When we stand relaxed, our arms don't hang straight and stiff.  They naturally curve to the front.  And that's why a two-piece sleeve is the best choice for a better range of motion.  I talk more in detail about the One-Piece Sleeve vs. Two-Piece Sleeve here.  And previously when I discussed how you can combine different interfacing techniques?  This is definitely one time when I do that.  Notice that I use fusible interfacing on the sleeve hems.  Yes, you SHOULD be interfacing your sleeve hems!  If you didn't know that, now you know.  To add interfacing, your interfacing should extend 1/2" beyond the hem.  My sleeve hem is 2", my interfacing is 2.5" wide.
This is my favorite way... well, my only way I will set a tailored sleeve.  I use bias cut hair canvas strips that are 2" x 12".  This method is perfection!  I always get a smooth sleeve with a softly rounded cap that is pucker-free on the first try!  Here is a detailed description on How to Set a Sleeve with Bias Strips in this post.
And I always use a lot of pins!
Still left do before I put my lining in is to add my custom made shoulder pads.
I'm loving the way the coat is turning out and I can't wait to be finished so I can start wearing this beauty. 

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15 comments

  1. Erica, it's refreshing to see someone posts abs share higher level sewing skills for others to see. The is so much more to sewing than the quick stitches and knits. I am definitely NOT knocking that because you have to start somewhere. So, is great that there are those that focus on that. But, as I've said, there's so much more to sewing like tailoring and fitting, that yields wonderful results like you share here. I did not have this info easily available to me as I was increasing my skill level. I, learned through hands on and research. So, to have you share this with others at NO cost is commendable and deserves applause. Kudos to you and keep doing what you do, you are truly fabulous in every way!

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    1. I should have proof read, lol! Sorry for the typos.

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    2. I didn't have info like this either when I was learning sewing. You don't know, what you don't know! And just like when I talked about making my first coat, I had no clue about what should've gone into that coat. Had I seen blog post about the type of sewing I do, it would've made me want to do it too. So, I'm just putting it out there. And everytime I see someone say, "Your sewing looks professional", it makes me sad. My sewing looks like "sewing". Just like a person -- a real, live human being, sat in a factory and sewed a coat you see hanging in a high-end store, I can sit in my house and make the same thing.

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  2. Erica,
    Your coat is so perfectly pressed. My next sewing investment might have to be that iron you mentioned!

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    1. Just press as you go. Sew a seam, press a seam! Your "final press" should be more like a touch up. Thanks Sheri!

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  3. I have such coat envy right now. This is such a great pattern and the fabric is perfect. I'm enjoying this sew-along series so much!

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  4. Erica, I'm desperate to subscribe here, but don't see how?? Please help :) Thanks Sally

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  5. I must join the chorus and say how nice it is to see a sewing blog written by someone with you skill level. Plus I share your taste, so I will save your blog as a favourite. Thanks!

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  6. I must join the chorus and say how nice it is to see a sewing blog written by someone with you skill level. Plus I share your taste, so I will save your blog as a favourite. Thanks!

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  7. This coat is gorgeous -- I love the shape of the lapels and the flattering diagonal line they create. I see that the post is from almost a year ago, so you must have finished this piece by now. I hope I can find the subsequent posts showing the finished coat!

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    1. Of course! I'm ready to start coats for this year! Thanks!

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